Immigration

  • Sponsoring an extended family member to immigrate
    Beyond parents, grandparents, children and spouses It is generally well known that Canadian citizens and permanent residents can sponsor their spouses, common-law partners, children, parents and/or grandparents to immigrate to Canada. What is less well-known is that in certain circumstances it is also possible for a Canadian citizen or permanent resident to ...
  • Nova Scotia wants immigrant doctors
    The province of Nova Scotia has introduced a new immigration stream to welcome more physicians to the Atlantic province for positions they have been unable to fill. According to the province’s immigration website, the Physician Stream will assist Nova Scotia’s public health authorities — the Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA) and ...
  • Fees reduced for minors applying for citizenship without a parent
    The fee for citizenship applications for minors applying without a parent (under subsection 5(1) of the Citizenship Act) has been reduced by the Government of Canada from $530 to $100. This follows a legislative amendment that removed the requirement to be 18 years old to apply for citizenship as of last June. ...
  • 10 strategies for success on the CELPIP English test
    Acing the English proficiency test required for PR and citizenship applications If you’re applying to become a permanent resident or citizen of Canada, taking the CELPIP English test is an important step toward your goal. The CELPIP test is the only Canadian test designated by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) to ...
  • Sponsors can ‘express their interest’ to sponsor parents on January 2
    Canadian citizens and permanent residents will soon be able to take the first step in applying to bring their parents and grandparents to Canada, when the Parents and Grandparents Program reopens in 2018. Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) introduced a new process in 2017 for application intake for sponsoring parents and ...